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Reviews of Manchester by the Sea; The Edge of Seventeen; Rules Don’t Apply 

Published in Movie Reviews
Tuesday, 22 April 2014 08:35

Review of Ruth Draper’s Monologues

annette-benning

In “Ruth Draper’s Monologues,” now at the Geffen Playhouse, Annette Bening peers above the Forth Wall and sees only empty seats. Portraying a real actress and writer playing fictional characters, Bening in this solo show displays a kind of friendly indifference to the presence of an actual audience. It’s her single-minded focus on faces and words that the rest of us don’t see or hear that gives the film star’s performance an eerie and riveting beauty.

Worth catching on DVD: Lisa Cholodenko’s The Kids Are All Right, for the sterling work of an ensemble cast led by Annette Bening and Julianne Moore as a couple whose kids open the proverbial can of worms when they discover the identity of their biological father.  That he’s handsome, successful, yet earthy Mark Ruffalo inspires the kids to some degree of hero-worship, while arousing varying levels of passion in a taken-for-granted Moore and a distrustful Bening. 
Published in Archived Movie Reviews

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